Stories about horrible bosses (and how to handle workplace bullying)


5 days ago

Workplace bullying is often linked to unequal power dynamics, says labour relations attorney Natasha Moni.

Moni explains that workplace bullying can be non-verbal and very under-handed.

Read also: What is constructive dismissal? (and how to prove it)

She advises that some workplace bullying can be legally considered as harassment and victimisation under the Employment Equity Act.

If an employee has evidence of harassment or victimisation, they are able to take the matter up at the Labour Court.

Usually the dispute will first start at the CCMA and the Bargaining Council, Moni adds.

Read more: The difference between insubordination and insolence (and which gets you fired)

Workplace bullying is an everyday occurrence. There is an intent on a result.

Natasha Moni, labor specialist Director at Moni Attorneys Incorporated, Part time commissioner at CCMA

Your workplace bully will say something like "I'm only doing this to make you a better person."

Natasha Moni, labor specialist Director at Moni Attorneys Incorporated, Part time commissioner at CCMA

Sometimes the bullying is no overt or verbal.

Natasha Moni, labor specialist Director at Moni Attorneys Incorporated, Part time commissioner at CCMA

She talks about cases of employees who've been targeted at work and several callers shared their difficult stories.

Callers told their tales of workplace bullying; from wrongful misconduct charges, to being targeted over of body weight, and dismissal via WhatsApp.

Lsten to the range of questions and cases shared during the World Of Work feature:

This article first appeared on 702 : Stories about horrible bosses (and how to handle workplace bullying)

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