[LISTEN] Craving a cuddle? Hankering for a hug? Makes sense say scientists...


151 days ago

Physical distancing.

One of the fundamental measures being taken to combat the spread of coronavirus.

No longer do we greet friends with a hug or colleagues with a handshake.

No touching is the rule and it's for the good of our physical health.

But what about our emotional wellbeing?

Why do we crave physical touch and can our need to be touched be traced back through evolution?

Yes, says Professor Robin Dunbar at the University of Oxford.

(Take a listen to the full conversation below)

It goes back to our basic evolutionary roots as primates. That's how primates build and service their friendships and social relationships.

Prof. Robin Dunbar, Professor of Evolutionary Psychology, Department of Experimental Psychology - University of Oxford

You see monkeys and baboons grooming each other endlessly. We sort of do the same thing...we've replaced that we hugs and cuddles.

Prof. Robin Dunbar, Professor of Evolutionary Psychology, Department of Experimental Psychology - University of Oxford

It's actually very good for you. Not only does it build friendships, but it releases endorphins.

Prof. Robin Dunbar, Professor of Evolutionary Psychology, Department of Experimental Psychology - University of Oxford

This article first appeared on CapeTalk : [LISTEN] Craving a cuddle? Hankering for a hug? Makes sense say scientists...

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